Liverpool & South West Lancashire FHS

Family History in the Hundred of West Derby
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PostPosted: 22:13:47 Wed 19/Feb/2014 
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Does anyone have easy access to the book written by R Stewart-Brown, Liverpool Ships in the Eighteenth Century? I wondered if this contained any mention of the shipwright John Harrison, who I believe was born c 1740; I'm researching John's daughter, Mary, bapt 26 Sep 1773 St, St Peter, Liverpool, Lancashire, England, who was born 7 Sep 1773, and would like to find out about her parents and especially about shipwright work at that time.

I have enquired at my local library but they do not have access to a copy of Stewart-Brown's book (I am a long way from Liverpool).

Any help appreciated.


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PostPosted: 10:02:03 Thu 20/Feb/2014 
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As your profile does not give any idea of your location I can only make the best suggestion I can.

Lancashire Library does indeed hold a copy in the Search Room of the Lancashire Record Office, which is at Bow Lane, Preston. This obviously wouldn't be available on inter library loan but a search of your local record office holdings may prove useful.

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PostPosted: 10:15:38 Thu 20/Feb/2014 
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I would be surprised to find a shipwright mentioned in a book about 18th century Liverpool ships. shipowners yes but not the men who actually built the ships.

My understanding is that a shipwright at the time would have been a trained carpenter/joiner working on ships. Of course I could be wrong.

I would look in early directories to see if your man is mentioned in those. Did he have any other children and if yes what occupation is given on their baptisms.

My other thought would be to see if he left a will. That would hopefully give the name of his wife and name his children.
.

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PostPosted: 10:17:17 Thu 20/Feb/2014 
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It was published by Hodder and Stoughton 1932.
Used as a reference about John Okill in Wikipedia
Added also by Lpool University Press.

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PostPosted: 07:55:57 Fri 21/Feb/2014 
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Firstly it should be explained that Shipwrights are handsome, debonair, chivalrous and an excellent catch for all women.

A Shipwright at the time of timber vessels would have had complete control over the construction of the ship/boat, from top to bottom he would have made, shaped and put together all the components that went into the actual vessel, the only other trades that would have probably been involved when nearing completion would have been sail makers and riggers if required.

Like most trades a Shipwright would have served an apprenticeship of about 7 years under a Master, learning his carpentry skills, having these skills as a carpenter quite often leads to confusion with a joiner, in Shipbuilding in the early days, no joiners were involved in the construction of ships.
In fact there's a passage in the bible and I quote
" If a Shipwright should seek to become a Joiner, he should have his brains bashed out first"

At sea a shipwright is known as the ships carpenter, the trade of Shipwright had to evolve with the change in materials used in shipbuilding and unfortunately no longer resembles what skills John Harrison would have had in the 18th century. The closest we have now are the Shipwrights/boat builders who still apply their trade building all timber vessels, but on a much smaller scale.

The versatility of Shipwrights was shown during WW2 when many of them were employed making Mosquito aircraft, which were made from timber and canvas.
That's why we won the war :wink:

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PostPosted: 10:28:47 Fri 21/Feb/2014 
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Bertieone wrote:
Firstly it should be explained that Shipwrights are handsome, debonair, chivalrous and an excellent catch for all women.

Anybody else get the idea that we now know Bert's occupation? ;) :lol:

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PostPosted: 17:48:55 Fri 21/Feb/2014 
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Quote:
(Anybody else get the idea that we now know Bert's occupation? ;) :lol:


Quite possibly. :D :D


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PostPosted: 20:21:02 Sat 22/Feb/2014 
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Many thanks to all for the responses, including the expert insider's input from Bert!

I have seen some references to shipwrights (though not John Harrison) in old online copies of Lloyd's Register, so am hoping that something might turn up in that source if I can consult it on a future visit to Liverpool if I can arrange this.

If I find out anything that I think may be of general interest I'll report back.

Thank you again.


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PostPosted: 09:14:47 Sun 23/Feb/2014 
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When I was at the help desk at Crosby library on Friday I asked if they had the book you wanted but thy didn't.

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PostPosted: 10:01:39 Sun 23/Feb/2014 
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We have not been able to verify that Liverpool holds a copy, please email them and ask before making your journey.

My previous post did state that it was the catalogue for Lancashire Library at PRESTON, which had the entry.

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MaryA
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Names - Lunt, Hall, Kent, Ayre, Forshaw, Parle, Lawrenson, Longford, Ennis, Bayley, Russell, Longworth, Baile
Any census info in this post is Crown Copyright, from National Archives


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PostPosted: 11:15:19 Sun 23/Feb/2014 
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Birkenhead Central Library have one copy, again I would check with them first,

Hope link works,

http://capitadiscovery.co.uk/wirral/ite ... ailability

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PostPosted: 16:37:35 Sun 23/Feb/2014 
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Thanks for all the additional information. I expect to be able to make the journey to Liverpool before I'm able to travel to Preston. There are references to the Stewart-Brown book on the Liverpool Maritime Museum site http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk/mari ... sheetId=32 but I'll contact them before I go to check whether it's available to consult during my visit.

Thanks again.


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